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>> tonight we start at the beginning, exploring the life and times of martha washington. >> martha washington was george washington's confidant. >> she was a person very absorbed in duty and very capable. but she didn't like that. she called herself a prisoner of state. >> by the same token that every step washington took to find the office, so in a very real sense kit be said everything martha washington did like wise. >> it was a business-like relationship, but not i think without affection. i think they had deep respect and affection for each other. >> it was as close to her how many town. she would own most of this block going back a couple acres, which mean she owned a huge chunk of what williamsburg was. there was a lot of tragedy in martha washington's life, she lost her first husband. she was raised a rich woman. now, what that means in 18th century is not familiesly what it means today. >> when she marries george washington she brings with her to mount vernon 12 house slaves, and that is really almost an unimaginable luxury. >> it takes her 10 days to travel here to valley
quick final question from julie the road from mt. verse non and washington's port city. hello. >> george washington and george may sorry were very good friends. two wives, had anne, and she passed away. and then sara. wondering what the relationship was between martha and either of george mason's wives? >> they were friendly neighbors know, they never became intimate friends. friendship was a political casualty. but after the constitutional onvention, which, of course, washington sanctioned and mason it spelled in , many ways an end to their friendship. twitter, george and martha washington, quite the power couple. we close out bringing us full circle, what are the important things for people to the influence of martha washington. >> i think it's important to powerful she and on and how dependent he was her. his achievements were his achievements. him aving her there with made them much more possible. >> i think that's true. defined influence in a way that perhaps contemporary have difficulty understanding. but the fact of the matter is, she was the most influential of the earth face w
leave veitch author of "this town" is with us. it's a brilliant expose of how washington d.c. turns out to be exactly as awful as everyone thinks it is. but we start tonight in russia. with edward snowden, the former n.s.a. contractor turned whistle blower and also of the upcoming lonely planet terminal-d of the moscow airport. so what has he been up to apart from nothing? >> russian news agencies reported that snowden would get a special i.d. card or document of some kind that would allow him to finally leave the airport transit zone. but it turns out that the lawyer wasn't carrying any such i.d. card. he did have some fresh clothes for us, some pizza and a couple of books by check often. >> john: that's nice because nothing lightens a man's spirits like theodore. i think you'll find him in barnes and enable's misery section. take that. now you understand suffering. i've got no problem with you, checkov. no problem. but like a hotel phone ringing at 5:30 a.m. because you specifically requested it, snowden has provided a real wake-up call. (laughing). he's forced americans to examine th
by side with james compilingelping him. and arranging his papers. >> she moved back to washington d.c. in her elder years and became very much behind the scenes in a political field again. >> as henry clay famously said, everybody loves mrs. madison. her equally famous response "that's because mrs. madison loves everybody." >> dolley madison came to her service as first lady with experience during thomas jefferson's two terms. the president often called on her to assist him. this sense of the usefulness of diplomacy allowed dolley to hit the ground wanting when she assumed the role in 1809 as her husband james madison became andpresident.good evening welcome. tonight we will learn about the intriguing dolley madison. we have two guests at our table. let me introduce you to them. catherine allgor, an author and biographer of dolley madison. and a historian. one of her books is called "a perfect union." thank you for being here. edith mayo was the creator of the first lady's exhibit at the smithsonian. so many smithsonian visitors have seen this throughout the years. thank you for bei
. definitionging the of cancelable reduce unnecessary treatments. washington journal is live tomorrow. will be back here with the c- span townhall tomorrow looking at immigration and the economy live at 7:00 eastern. thank you for joining us this evening. session two of first ladies and ladies, influence image begins. all this month we are showing encore presentations of season one. programs on every first lady from martha washington to ida mckinley. tonight, it is doubly medicine. -- dolly madison. >> dolley was socially adept and politically savvy. >> she was his best friend. she compensated. >> james madison wishes to meet her. >> she carved out a space for women where they can wield a great deal of political power. >> dolley madison would sit at the head of the table and erect the conversation. >> she got these people to the white house and entertained them. got them together and got them talking. >> this was important to her to make everyone feel welcome. >> it was considered her classic look. people noticed it. >> it was a perfect setting for james and dolley madison >> she sat side by side w
on washington with those who lived it. >>> yesterday tens of thousands of americans converged on the nation's capital to commemorate the 50 th anniversary of the 1963 march on washington. it was a historic event that spurred the enactment of the civil rights and voting rights act and one that is now remembered as one of the moral high points of american history. but that is not what political leaders, major media outlets and millions of everyday americans were expecting right up until that march began in 1963. they were bracing for violence and chaos. they were fearing strident and inflammatory rhetoric and they were convinced the main effect of the rally would be to inflict a grievous wound, maybe even a fatal wound, on a very movement it sought to advance. that is the context in which the march took place 50 years ago this week. context that can and all too often is lost to history. it came at a particularly crucial and politically sensitive time in the civil rights movement. three months before the march, in may of 1963, demonstrations in birmingham -- excuse me, demonstrators in birming
it in 50 years. the 1963 march on washington. >> now back to roger mudd. >> here at the lincoln memorial, the sight that is almost something no washingtonian has beheld. >> news reports from the march along with coverage of the civil rights movement helped change minds about the protesters and the fight to end segregation. we'll talk with the reporters who were there, including dan rather, who reported for cbs news and paul delaney, a founding member of the national association of black journalists. >>> plus "the new york times" says espn dropped its partnership with public tv's "front line" when the nfl objected to a documentary about head injuries. does this show the influence sports leagues have over sports journali journalism's biggest player? >>> and are you one of the movie goers that made this the top-grossing film last weekend? >> there he is. what's your name sdm. >> cecil gaines. >> i'm carter wilson, head butler. >> did you know the story of "the butler" began with one reporter's quest for the ultimate white house insider? we'll talk with the "washington post"'s wil haygood ab
to make the first march on washington and i never really got over that until president obama said please lead us in the invocation, and that was in january of this year. thank you reverend sharpton and others for asking me to lend a few words to this most precious gatheri gathering as i look out at the crowd, i find myself saying, what are we doing today? where have we come from? what has been accomplished and where do we go from this point forwa forward? i think of one theme that has been played over and over in the past few months and it's one that bring great controversy. stand your ground. and we can think of standing your ground in the negative, but i ask you today to flip that coin and make stand your ground a positive ring for all of us who believe in freedom and justice and equality, that we stand firm on the ground that we have already made and be sure that nothing is taken away from us because there are efforts to turn back the clock of freedom. and i ask you today will you allow that to happen? take the words "stand your ground" in a positive sense. stand your ground in terms
and from her tenure as publisher and ceo and chair of the board of "the washington post" company. mrs. graham was at the helm of "the washington post" during that era of the pentagon papers and watergatwatergat e. in august of 2013 "the washington post" was sold to amazon founder jeffrey pesos. this is about one hour. c-span: katharine graham, author of "personal history," did your children learn anything from this book about you? >> guest: that's a hard question. i'm sure they probably did, but i couldn't tell you exactly what. c-span: all the stuff in here about your early life and your husband and all that, did they know that? have you-all talked that out? >> guest: yes, i think they understand that he was ill. they--the oldest one was 20, and the youngest one was 11, so they had to deal with it then and always. c-span: the question i had after i read the book was, 'why do you want us to know all this?' >> guest: i really don't suppose that i meant to just tell everything to everybody. but once i sat down to write my story, i just tend to be frank and open, and i wanted to be very
't it be nice if we had her back in washington now. >> we only skimmed the surface in 90 minutes of 81 entering years of life. if you want to learn more. i thank the white house historical association for their ♪elp in this series. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] ♪ >> on c-span tonight, libyan activist discuss. then another chance to watch "first ladies" on the life of dolley madison. >> coming up on the next "washington journal," -- 's tomorrow night, on c-span encore presentation of "first ladies" -- is not>> campaigning allowed. you cannot do that and you cannot ask for office directly. you have used subtle back channels. women were a good conduit for that. come to spread their gossip and ask their favors. she knows she cannot trust these people. she is not naÏve. a lot of them are spreading false information, false gossip, they are misleading and have all of their own agendas. she is aware of the political gain going on and is not a fan. >> the encore presentation continues tomorrow night at 9:00 eastern o
night at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span programs on every first lady from martha washington to ida mckinley. tonight, sarah polk, mark rhett taylor and abigail fillmore. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] sarah polk was on diplomacy and her strong suit is intelligence and political discussion. >> she made no bones about the fact she took an interest in politics. and that she was her husband's partner. >> she grew naup political household in tennessee. her father was a local politician so she grew up loving politics. she married james after he won a seat in the legislature. because she would not have married him if he had -- >> unfortunately for james k. polk he died three months after leaving the white house. and sarah began a 42-year widowhood. polk place became a shrine to her husband and she would invite anybody who wanted to to come to visit and see the objects she had collected through her long and illustrious political career. >> to live there for many years on her own. during the civil war, generals on both
-span. programs on every first lady, from martha washington. tonight, elizabeth munro and catherine adams. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] ♪ >> elizabeth monroe was a true partner in her husband's career. they were a love story and absolutely devoted to each other. elizabeth monroe had a well- developed sense of style and image. this is a woman who knew how to carry herself with great elegance. >> it is called the era of good feeling. >> this is a woman who spoke french. >> very great beauty. she received is seldom anything in the white house. she hated it. >> dignity, civility. those are the words that come to mind. >> elizabeth monroe served as first lady from 1817 to 1825 as a time known as the era of good feeling. coming up, we will explore her life and what were not always happy times inside the white house for this woman born into a well-to-do new york family. she married james monroe at the age of 17 and traveled new york extensively with him. she brought with her to the white house a certain french
cord, tacoma washington. >> a short time okay t hamid karzi reacted to the bales' sentencing >> a life sentence to him or a death sentence to him will not bring back our children that he killed. if will not bring back the happiness of those families and will not replace the loss that the afghan nation suffered. >>> karzi also said he does not back capital punishment and asked that the u.s. provided compensation to the families of those killed. >>> the sentencing phase of the trial begins made for major nadal hassan. a military jury found him guilty of killing 13 fellow soldiers in 2009. hassan admitted to the murders in court and had no reaction on friday when the guilty verdict was red. the jury will now decide if he will be executed for his crimes or spend the rest of his life in prison. >>> washington state police are hunting for a teenager who is suspected of beating an 88-year-old world war ii veteran to death. another teenager is already in custody for the crime. police found the veteran in his car on wednesday with serious injuries. he died in the hospital yesterday. so far, police do no
. ♪ [applause] >> thank you. 50 years ago, they did not take a bus outing to come to washington. there will be those that will miscast this as some great social event. but let us remember 50 years ago some came to washington having rode the back of buses. some came to washington that couldn't stop and buy a cup of coffee until they got across the mason dixon line. some came to washington sleeping in their cars because they couldn't rent a motel room. some came to washington never having had the privilege to vote. some came having seen their friends shed blood. but they came to washington so we could come today in a different time and a different place and we owe them for what we have today. [applause] i met a man not long ago, i tell it often, he says i'm african american but i don't understand all this civil rights marching you're talking about, reverend al. i've accomplished, i've achieved. look at my resume. i went to the best schools. i'm a member of the right clubs. i had the right people read my resume. civil rights didn't write my resume. i looked at his resume. i said, y
think about the march on washington they only think about the dream speech and that part of the speech. they don't think about anything else and you are right. he said a lot harsher things than anyone talked about. this is including the absence of women on the stage on purpose. they even missed the dream part of the speech. they were looking so much for the violence that they did not see it. i'm wondering how they thought, with anyen there, notice that they've missed the story. >> i want to address media coverage on the march on washington and i remember the three major networks were there. withoutered it interruption and they broadcasted it to europe. "the washington post" assign more than 60 reporters to cover that story. it was really big news. a congressman, you said that the civil rights movement without the media would be like a bird without wings. what did you mean? >> i meant that. >> i know you did, but tell us what you meant. without the media, especially in the american south, without reporters, without the photographer, without the cameras to bring the message .nto the livi
in the 1963 march on washington remember the events of that day in a discussion hosted by the martin luther king, jr. memorial library in washington, d.c. this is an hour 30 minutes. >> when our archivist suggested that i conduct oral histories with people that attended the march, i jumped at the opportunity to hear firsthand accounts of the days that i, like many of you, had only known about in books, photos and media reflections. i was curious about literal and other journeys that people took to get to the lincoln memorial on that hot august day in 1963. we put out a call for people it into the march to be interviewed and the panelists here today were the first to answer that call. it is important to note that this is the beginning of an ongoing project and derek and our collection not only oral histories but also memorabilia and other artifacts from the march to the washingtonian the community archive. two of the panelists, peter bailey and doctor ella kelly were right under my nose as their regular attendees to the black studies lecture series that takes place in the black study center
challenging moments of diplomacy, the u.s. and russia held high-level meetings in washington. margaret warner recaps today's talks. >> brown: four out of ten street lights don't work and it takes an hour on average for detroit police to respond to 9-1-1 calls. hari sreenivasan looks at the motor city's battle amid bankruptcy. >> detroiters are so used to bad news, and they are so used to things not really breaking our way, and they're used to getting up the next morning and going, "well, i can't stop, i've got to keep going, i've got to keep trying." >> woodruff: david brooks and ruth marcus analyze the week's news. >> brown: and yes, those are goats in that graveyard. more than a hundred of them. kwame holman tells us what they're doing in this historic washington, d.c., cemetery. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour h been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> an
which found the unemployment rate went up in 28 state and declined in eight states. "washington journal" is next. >> the president's plan to try to keep college more affordable is already getting some reaction from capitol hill. we might have to weigh in. some are in support and some are critical saying the new ranging system that the president put out is arbitrary. meantime college can cost up to $30,000 year on average now for some folks and the debt load students carrying can be the same amount. with that background is the cost of college worth it? that's the question for you this friday morning. republicans call 202-585-3881, democrats 202-585-3880 and independents 202-585-3882. look forward to your calls and also your participation by social media. you can send us a tweet at twitter @c-span wj. you can also send an e-mail journal@c-span.org. is the cost of college worth it? allen writes, it used to be but right now it slightly losing steam. now people that are caught with a minimum of expectations while being strapped with a new burden of paying back the loan making short m
washington post" company agreed monday to sell its flagship newspaper to amazon.com founder and chief executive jeffrey these those. ownership of the paper after four generations. next week at back at former "washington post" owner the late katharine graham discussing her biography, personal history. c-span: author personal history did your children learn anything from this book about you? >> guest: that's a hard question. i'm sure they probably did but i couldn't tell you exact a wife. c-span: all of the stuff in here about your early life and your husband about that, did you talk that out? >> guest: yes, i think they understand that he was ill. the oldest one was 20 and the youngest one was 11 so they had to deal with it then and always. c-span: the question i had after i read the book was why do you want us to know all of this? >> guest: i really don't suppose that i meant to tell everything to everybody but once i sat down to write my story i just tend to be frank and open and i wanted to be very truthful and i wrote it the way i saw it. i told it the best i could. c-span: when di
organized a march on washington. he buys black, gay, and a pacifist. he will be honored with the posthumous medal of freedom. naegle,speak to walter and john d'emilio, author of "lost prophet: the life and times of bayard rustin." all that and more coming up. to democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. a u.s. drone strike killed two people in yemen on saturday. the u.s. has now carried out nine drone strikes in two weeks, killing 38 people. it is the most concentrated series of drone strikes in a decade. yemeni official told cnn the number of strikes was actually 12 and nearly a dozen of those killed were believed to be innocent. the united states has reopened 18 of the 19 diplomatic posts in the middle east and north africa due to an alleged threat. the embassy in yemen will remain closed, as well as the one in pakistan to to an unrelated threat. the guardian newspaper has revealed the national security agency has a backdoor into its databases come along and to search the e-mails and phone calls of americans without warrants. a previously undisclosed rule change allows o
. >> announcer: from nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> straight to the breaking news. a heavy security presence in cairo, egypt, this morning as military rulers are trying to strengthen their control over a country descending into chaos. so, how much worse will it get in egypt? hundreds are dead, nearly 40 christian churches have been torched and looted, and supporters of the ousted president morsi, the muslim brotherhood, are vowing to fight back. we'll have a live report coming up from cairo in just a moment, but back here in washington, the critical question is, are u.s. taxpayers, in effect, footing the bill for the continuing violence? joining me now, two members of the senate armed services committee, democrat jack reed of rhode island and republican kelly ayotte of new hampshire. senators, welcome to you both. senator ayotte, straight to you. several weeks ago, this question came up -- should we keep the u.s. aid flowing to egypt? you said yes then. have you had a change of heart now? >> well, i think, david, in lig
a moment, but back here in washington, the critical question is, are u.s. taxpayers, in effect, footing the bill for the continuing violence? joining me now, two members of the senate armed services committee, democrat jack reed of rhode island and republican kelly ayotte of new hampshire. senators, welcome to you both. senator ayotte, straight to you. several weeks ago, this question came up -- should we keep the u.s. aid flowing to egypt? you said yes then. have you had a change of heart now? >> well, i think, david, in light of recent actions, we tried to give some time to the administration. they obviously tried to get the military government to not crack down in a violent way, to restore democracy, to move to elections, to release political prisoners. they have ignored all of those requests. and now with the recent violent crackdown, i do not see how we can continue aid. i believe it must be suspended because, unfortunately, i think the military's gotten the impression, and particularly with what the president not asking for aid to be suspended when he spoke this week, that whateve
material, in connection with the speech he gave on the march on washington, i had provided him with a summary of ideas and summary of language that he had previously discussed. so it wasn't as if i was providing him with some creative ideas that were solely mine. i was more like a secretary who was summarizing and putting in the form that could be used for the speech, the opening paragraphs, little did i know, until i was sitting listening to him, i was standing some 50 feet behind him, when i was listening very carefully, i said, oh, my god, i guess he decided to use those opening paragraphs. to those paragraphs, which constituted the first seven paragraphs. to those opening paragraphs, he seemlessly added his own additional paragraphs, and it was when he was speaking his own additional paragraphs that he was interrupted from the written speech that he had prepared. and he was interrupted by mahalia jackson who shouted to him, tell him about the dream, martin. tell him about the dream. most people don't know that the speech which is so frequently celebrated over the years, the
on the washington debate. thank you both very much for your time this morning. >> thank you. >> let me bring in richard engel, our chief foreign correspondent, on the ground in cairo, as well as senior fellow at the woodrow wilson center, robin wright, an expert on the broader middle east for context here. richard, your reporting has been compelling from the chaotic streets of cairo. given your sense of things, where is this headed? >> reporter: well, i think a lot of it depends on what happens in washington. and just to continue on the debate you were just having, people in this country and around the region think it would be an absolutely disastrous idea for the united states to cut off aid, that washington has real interests with the egyptian military, preferential access to the suez canal, military overflights, and not to mention the camp david accords. the camp david accords brokered by the united states, the peace agreement between israel and egypt, says in principle that u.s. aid should be commensurate between israel, from washington to israel and from washington to egypt. and does th
surviving speaker at the 1963 march on washington when dr. king gave the "i have a dream" speech. you were a leader to the selma to montgomery march and a recipient of the presidential medal of freedom and profiles in courage award and you have a new book. i'm exhausted. (laughter). (cheers and applause) >> don't be exhausted. it's all right. >> stephen: i want to say that you do not outcivil rights pioneer me. because i held in my hand this is a banner from the march on washington, all right? got that. august 28, 1963, all right? this is in my hand because i was there. all right? in my mama's belly. she was pregnant with me and she was at the "i have a dream" speech so don't feel all high and mighty. i was at the "i have a dream speech" too. >> do you hear me? >> it was a little muffled. and i'm not sure if i'd developed ears yet. but, yeah, it was -- >> i spoke number six and dr. king spoke number ten. >> so you were the sixth person to speak. if i'm not mistaken, near the end of your speech you kept on saying "wake up." >> i'd say "wake up, america." and he said "i have a dream." so wer
the broadcast the washington post reports the national security agency has broken privacy rules or overstepped its legal authority thousands of times each year since it was given broad new spy powers by congress in 2008. in a separate post story, the leader of the secret court that supposed to oversee the spy program says its ability to do so is limited and that it must trust the government to report when it improperly spies on americans. we will have more on the story with alexander abdo after the headlines. reuters is reporting edward snowden began downloading documents related to widespread u.s. spying while working for dell last april, almost a year earlier than has previously been reported breed prior stories have focused on snow and subsequent three-month stint with contractor booz allen hamilton holding. snowden said that people associate with his father have, in his words, misled journalists into printing false claims about my situation. snowden said neither his father nor his father's lawyer nor his lawyer's wife and spokesperson represent him in any way. in lebanon, a car bomb tore t
of freedom. we will talk about who he was as we move in on the 50th anniversary of the march on washington, which he organized. ♪ [music break] >> this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. white house has announced it will posthumously award the highest civilian honor in the united states come the presidential medal of freedom, to civil rights activist bayard rustin. obama will award him and 16 others at the white house later this year. in his own day, bayard rustin was a minority within the minority who tirelessly agitated for change. , awas an african-american gay man fighting against homophobia, and a pacifist fighting against endless war. he was a key advisor to martin luther king and introduced him to teachings of gondi and nonviolence. he helped to found the southern leadership conference. he was later the chief organizer of the historic march on washington for jobs and freedom, rallying hundreds of thousands of people for economic justice, full employment voting rights, and people opportunity. >> segregation shall be ended in every distri
canceled his meeting with russian president vladimir putin. that is all next on "washington journal." ♪ is sunday,orning, it august 11 come up 20 13. it is today, resident obama began his week long vacation at martha's vineyard. today we will be discussing the state of u.s. relations with dive intoking a deep u.s. job numbers, and talking about recent al qaeda threats. before we do that we want to hear about the state of news media from our viewers. the pew research center's -- you research center released its biannual data and while there is still plenty of criticism about the industry, most americans continue to believe the media plays an important watchdog role. as we take you through that reports this morning, we want to hear your thoughts. he of us a call. we split our lineup -- we split our lines up by age group. you can also catch up with us on all of your favorite social media sites, on twitter and facebook. you can also e-mail us at .ww.c-span.org we want to take you to that report that was released on thursday by the pew research center for the people. public valuations
jefferson, lincoln, washington had fought for. the only, i think, two pieces of oratory that would rival it would be fdr's, the only thing we have to fear is fear itself and president kennedy inaugural address. martin luther king joined the founding fathers 50 years ago today. >> reverend al sharpton obviously an important event 50 years ago. 50 years laterer there will be an african-american president going to commemorate this moment. what an extraordinary journey it has been and the journey, as you say every day and as all americans understand, the journey continues. what do you want to hear from the president of the united states today? >> well, i think that what we want to hear is a commitment to continue that journey but to also salute the fact that we have made the journey. we met with him two days ago after having a huge march on saturday about the issues now. and one of the things that i said is that i feel that he should not be compared to dr. king. he is the president. we want to hear from him as the generation before us heard from kennedy about what we are going to do. so i th
/11. after the bell stunner, jeff bezos buys "the washington post" for $250 bucks. and the bankrupt city of detroit starts the process of putting its priceless museum artwork up for auction. you wouldn't believe how much it could be worth. all those stories and much more coming up on the "kudlow report" right now. good evening, i'm larry kudlow. this is the "kudlow report." first up tonight, breaking news, jeff bezos paying $250 million for "the washington post" newspaper. a few days ago boston red sox owner john henry bought the "boston globe" for the bargain basement price of only $70 million. what is going on here? why will these foes succeed while others have failed. joining us is our own julia boorstin. why will they succeed where others have failed in. >> i think the question is how do you define success? one thing jeff bezos makes very clear in his letter about this and it was also in the press release is that he's not investing this just as a financial endeavor but he sees this as supporting journalism. he says "i understand the critical role the post plays in washington, d.c. an
over. ♪ >> mr. obama is back in washington. his response to the crisis in egypt continues to come under fire. >> for us to sit by and watch this happen is a violation of everything that we stood for. >> the administration is not signaling any major shift in policy. >> we're going to have a bill in egypt and have to sus. end our aid. >> it shows nothing but american weakness. >> i don't knowian senator paul is so out of wac about this. >> this all started with him say wiig don't have room for libertarian republicans. the party's big enough for both of us. >> stop, question frisk have made new york city the safest big city. >> stop and frick is abandoned will, people die? >> no question, violent crime will go up. violence is happening disproportionately enough of minority communities. >> it's a slippery slope. >> like burning down the house to rid it of mice. ♪ we open a new week with the president back in d.c. after a family vacation on martha's vineyard facing questions how his administration will handle two vital concerns to the nation. internationally, there's still a question of ho
is to prevent chemical weapons from being deployed. >> mike viquera in washington. >>> opposition leader general sallim edris about the three-year conflict. must aftoustapha helped organiz trip. thank you for being with us. >> thank you. >> did senator john mccain indicate any american involvement during that trip back in may? >> during his trip, senator mccain, who had been long an advocate for greater leadership in the forklift of syria, on behalf of the syrian revolution and the people discussed the need for greater leadership and intervention by the united states but stated the sort of political realities in washington and that at the end of the day, the decision remains the president's, but he assured in multiple meetings including with general hadris that he continued to work in congress and in the senate to add more pressure on administration to act. >> have members of congress been in contact since the alleged checkcal we hope attack >> as far as i know, since the weaponstac that happened a few days ago, there has been no contact between members of congress and him directly, but i wouldn
that was water. the river came in much closer. it is now washington. as you walk that in fact was the nec as you come in from now the south bend and to boston. it was one of dozens to occupy the gigantic boston harbor and the british had the needy. they kept the entrance open so they could get provisions whether they be from england or from canada. this meant that even though they were completely surrounded by land, boston as a british occupied garrison wasn't going to start. in june of 1775 and this was a battle like none other to it like a terrified young spectator event for those not only living in boston, but in towns around all of the roots of boston were filled with people watching as more than 2,000 regulars made their way across the harbor and the charles river to the charlestown peninsula and began the assault that would erupt into the battle of bunker hill. so this was something viewed by anyone here and then there would settle into a stalemate that would then have george washington archive and that would change anything. and then eventually in march 17, 1776, the british would be forc
. grew up in washington, d c -- d.c. she knew dolley madison when she was a little girl. they went to st. john's church on lafayette square. when she was 5-10 years old, she knew dolly madison. her father was a very famous naval commandants who took a ship on a commercial ship that went down. it was an act of bravery because he made sure that all the passengers on board got off a first. his widow and his daughter, their only child, then living in new york city were given all sorts of awards, a monument to him at annapolis naval academy. alan arthur is really interesting. she does not become first lady, but she influences the administration. very similar to racial jackson jacksonl the way that she was the ghost, the memory of her. chester arthur made several appointments, four we know of, specifically of people who had known his wife. one was a cousin in the office of the attorney general made assistant attorney general. another was in the treasury. it was very controversial that he named the superintendent of the naval academy, he appointed a friend of theirs, a childhood friend of his w
knowing exactly what he is up against, which was eloquently diagnosed 530 miles away from washington, d.c. in lexington, kentucky today by the 34-year-old democratic kentucky secretary of state, allison lundergin grimes, who is running to unseat republican mitch mcconnell in the senate. >> there is a disease in the dysfunction in washington, d.c. and after nearly 30 years, mitch mcconnell was at the center of it. where once, congressmen and senators would come together to work together for the common good. we now have senator mcconnell, the proud grid lock, grinding the government to a hold. senator mcconnell has blocked legislation that could actually help kentucky and move this nation forward. and for the past few years, he has done it for the worst possible reason, a reason that my grandmother would tell you was no motivation at all. out of spite. >> senator mcconnell offered this welcome to president obama on the senate floor in advance of his visit to the hill. >> it really would be nice to see president obama work with congress for a change. to get some important things done for t
with a predictably defensive editorial by mayor michael bloomberg in the "washington post" in which the mayor took turns defending stop and fricsk and attacking the "washington post," itself, and others were criticizing the practice saying "the men and women who protect our city from criminals and terrorists deserve better than to have their integrity impugned in a courtroom or a newspaper especially when the facts are so clearly on their side." even today speaking at a press conference, touting the largest gun seizure in new york history, both men looked to play up the role of stop and frisk in getting guns off the street. >> wiretap conversations from this investigation show that one of the gun traffickers' biggest concerns was stop, question, frisk. >> campbell didn't want to risk it being found by new york police and is heard saying, "yeah. i'm in charlotte now. i can't take them to my house, to my side of town, in brownsville. we got, like, watchamacallit, stop and frisk. >> mayor bloomberg and commissioner kelly doubling down and repeating the same statements again and again over stop and fr
and jobs come back. >> we have seen this in new york city and washington, d.c. if you take an area and turn it in a place with business and people employ and have jobs to get young people in workplace to keep them busy it's very important. going to the arguement that juan has made all week, the kids from the single parent homes are likely to live in poverty and commit crimes. this costs us money in lives and dollars. >> eric: juan, if you apply to this horrific killing that happened outside of oklahoma city, where three young people shot someone for fun, how does it apply? >> these are teenagers. one father in the courtroom said my son could haven't done it. wake up, dude. c'mon. we have kids online, spewing all kind of hateful messages. no structure around them. they are bore and think it's okay to tracksome somebody like an animal and kill them. sick. >> eric: important word that juan used. they were "bored." that's because they weren't working. >> true. >> you have to get them involved, too. i don't care, it could be community work. you could do anything. it requires some kind of leaders
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